Carolyn, Felicia & the Bassoon Case Cover

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Felicia Foland, Carolyn White

Felicia Foland, Carolyn White and a brand new cover

There is a new member of the St. Louis Symphony. It is an addition that almost brought bassoonist Felecia Foland to tears. “I am just so happy,” she said. “I could cry.” Felicia has a brand new custom-made bassoon case cover.

The red, black and gold cover is easy on the eye, but the process of getting the cover was hard. “I invested in a new case for my bassoon, but I could not find a cover that fit,” she said. That’s when Bassist Carolyn White jumped into action.

Carolyn spent weeks making the bassoon case cover for Felicia. Carolyn is known for her precise play with the orchestra, but her talents extend beyond the stage. She has been working on creative projects, like the bassoon case cover, since she was six. “I really enjoy it,” she said. “It is my purpose in life.”

Carolyn once made red sequins shoes for the entire orchestra to wear during a performance of the Wizard of Oz.

The cover is waterproof and will help protect Felicia’s bassoon from cold winters and hot summers. It is also equipped with zippers that Carolyn ordered from New York, and It has a special pocket for bassoon reeds and sheet music. Felicia showed off the cover backstage during a recent STL Symphony rehearsal. ‘It’s just so beautiful,” she said.

Some people might call the case a simple accessory, but for Carolyn and Felicia it is a symbol of the bond shared between STL Symphony musicians.

Never Can Say Goodbye

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So I won’t.

All the best.

Dropping the Mic

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Thursday will be my last day of employment at the St. Louis Symphony. I’m moving on to a new job at the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.

I’ve been with the Symphony for 13 years, blogging for 12, somewhere in there a video blog got started with a pocket-size flip cam.

When I started at the orchestra after Labor Day weekend 2003, I told my colleagues “I love being here and I love you for having me.” I still feel that. I’ve worked with some of the brightest, most talented, most passionate people I’ve ever met. Working alongside such folk, whether their business is on the stage or behind the scenes, has been a true gift for which I am most grateful.

And I’ve enjoyed connecting with the blog audience over this time. I’ve had fun doing it and I hope you’ve had some fun following along.

I have other wishes, other dreams, other passions to fulfill. The St. Louis Symphony will be a part of me always.

Self Present and Selves Past

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The blessings of the office speakers: Scott Andrews rehearsed Pierre Boulez’s Dialogue de l’ombre double (Dialogue of the Double Shadow), a piece for clarinet and live electronics, on the Powell Hall stage Friday afternoon. It’s a composition of sonic wonder. Andrews plays live along with recordings of himself. The recordings were made a few years ago, and are constant, but Andrews’ live musicianship is always changing. He told me it had the feeling of performing with past selves. His description made me think of Arthur Rimbaud’s famous phrase Je est un autre: “I is someone else.”

Principal Clarinet Scott Andrews

Principal Clarinet Scott Andrews

But for all that Dialogue of the Double Shadow may make you and I think, or marvel at the technosound strategies, it is the magic and mystery it leaves behind when it is done that is most compelling. A haunting. These sounds you’ve heard–you will never hear them again.

Eyes on the Sky

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St. Louis Symphony eyes have stayed on the sky and on the radar, and a few people with barometers for knees have been consulted, and as of mid-afternoon Wednesday systems are go for the Forest Park concert. If the skies change, check the news, check our website, check our social media. For now, it looks like a great night to listen to the Symphony under the stars–and then fireworks!

Eyes on the sky

Eyes on the sky

On the Air

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The Flight of Lindbergh was originally conceived for radio. Composer Kurt Weill and librettist Bertolt Brecht wanted to reach the masses with their Lindbergh tale, so they wrote for the most popular, and intimate, mass medium of the 1920s. Singers, an orchestra, right in your home.

microphoneTo provide the feel of a live broadcast from a previous age of technological wonders, David Robertson has plotted some unique stage directions. KMOX radio’s Charlie Brennan will serve as narrator, and he’ll be situated near center stage at an old desk and at much older vintage microphone.

Matters of Scale

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The St. Louis Symphony performed Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone to packed houses this past weekend.

STL Symphony Principal Trombone Tim Myers and members of the 399th Army Band.

STL Symphony Principal Trombone Tim Myers and members of the 399th Army Band.

But the musicians give their all to SRO audiences or in the most intimate settings. Last Wednesday, prior to the concert in Rolla, Missouri, members of the orchestra taught master classes to soldiers from the 399th Army Band, who drove over from Ft. Leonard Wood.

Gemma New & YO at Clayton High

Gemma New & YO at Clayton High

Gemma New, fresh from her debut with the STL Symphony in Rolla, was in the music room at Clayton High for the first St. Louis Symphony Youth Orchestra rehearsal of the season on Saturday.

On Wednesday night there will be more than 10,000 on Art Hill in Forest Park listening to the St. Louis Symphony, led by David Robertson. The atmosphere will be as intense as in a small studio in Rolla, or a music room in Clayton, or a capacity Powell Hall.

 

 

Get Ready

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A view from the timpani before Harry Potter’s adventures and John Williams’ music begin.

potter-timpani

Preparations

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The word from Rolla is that they heard a terrific St. Louis Symphony concert Wednesday night, with an exciting debut for Resident Conductor Gemma New. Thursday afternoon the orchestra is back on the Powell Hall stage rehearsing Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. From Schumann to John Williams, these musicians can turn on a dime.

img_1062While the orchestra was out of town, the stage crew prepared the big screen for Harry Potter. A layer of Visqueen had torn, and here it gets taped back together on the backside of the screen so light won’t bleed through and all the images remain clear, colorful and Harry Potterfull for the full-houses at Powell.

The Road to Rolla

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The St. Louis Symphony was on the Powell Hall stage rehearsing a program that features Schumann’s Symphony No. 3, “Rhenish,” with new Resident Conductor Gemma New, the day-after Labor Day. The Symphony hits the road to Rolla, Missouri to perform “Rhenish,” Beethoven’s Egmont Overture and Wagner’s Siegfried Idyll Thursday for the Leach Theatre’s 25th-anniversary gala. If you want to witness New’s premiere with the orchestra, this might be the road trip for you.

Left to right: Christopher Dwyer and Roger Kaza

Left to right: Christopher Dwyer and Roger Kaza

After the rehearsal, horn players Chris Dwyer and Roger Kaza looked as excited as two kids back to the first day of school. I asked them to say, “Horn.”